Dental Crowns: Types of Dental Crowns

Dental Crowns: Types of Dental Crowns

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There are different types of dental crowns to choose from prior to having crowns placed. You need to discuss the pros and cons of each different type of placement with your dentist before you make your choice. Many people prefer the natural look of porcelain fused to metal, all porcelain, or all ceramic placements. That is because these types of crowns can be color matched to the color of your teeth for a more natural look. Unfortunately, these options are typically prone to chipping and breaking because they are not as strong as metal crowns.

Metal crowns are made from different types of alloy for a stronger, more secure form of protection. Wear and tear involved with this type of placement is minimal and can withstand anything that your natural teeth can. They are the longest lasting crown, which also means they are less expensive to maintain since you do not have to have them redone as often as other types of crowns. However, the color of these crowns tends to be a drawback. Most individuals tend to avoid metal crowns, at least on the front teeth where they are most noticeable. Having metal dental crowns on the front teeth can cause deterioration in self-consciousness.

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All-resin dental crowns are preferred since they are usually the least expensive type of crown. The cheaper price can be beneficial if you need several crowns. The cost saving benefit can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the price of other crowns. However, they can also end up being more expensive since it is likely that you will have to replace them more often than other crown types. Unfortunately, all-resin crowns tend to be weaker than most other crowns. That means that they are more likely to fracture. Porcelain fused to metal crowns tends to be stronger and therefore, they are the most preferred type of crown to use.

If your dentist suggests the placement of crowns, he or she will likely provide you with temporary crowns until your permanent crowns are created. Your permanent crowns are made in a laboratory. That means that it can take up to a few weeks for them to be ready for placement. As a result, temporary dental crowns are placed. Temporary crowns are typically made of either stainless steel or acrylic. They are not designed for long-term use. Therefore, you should not try to wear temporary crowns in place of permanent crowns.

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Source by Chris J. Phillips