Dental Crowns: Understanding the Placement of Dental Crowns

Dental Crowns: Understanding the Placement of Dental Crowns

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Dental crowns are considered a cosmetic dental procedure. They are often used to protect weakened teeth from further damage. For example, a cracked or broken tooth can break even further without the protection of a dental crown. In terms of cosmetic surgery, a crown can be used to hide the appearance of discolored and misshapen teeth. In all honesty, your smile is the first thing that people notice. Therefore, you want your smile to be beautiful. Crown placement typically involves more than one professional. A prosthodontist makes the crowns for you and an oral surgeon places the crowns.

Prior to receiving dental crowns, you need to understand who is a good candidate and who is not. If you suffer from any form of periodontal disease, crowns are not the answer. Crowns do not stop the spread of a periodontal disease. Therefore, your dentist will typically not recommend a crown if you have an oral disease. It is not recommended that you get crowns if you currently go through radiation therapies that occur around the head or neck area. Make sure that you go through with a full dental examination so that your dentist can determine if the placement of crowns is right for you.

Dental crowns cover the tooth down to the gum line. Therefore, if the gums recede it can reveal the tooth, or partial tooth underneath. The crown is shaped like a tooth and can be created to match the color of your teeth so that they have a more natural look. This dental procedure typically lasts at least seven years. However, as time goes by the crown can deteriorate meaning that you will have to go back to the dentist to have them fixed or redone. Therefore, the placement of dental crowns can get expensive.

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The dentist will prepare your teeth before you receive your dental crowns. If your tooth is badly decayed, the dentist may recommend a root canal prior to the placement of your crowns. A root canal will prevent the tooth from decaying even more. However, a root canal is not a necessary procedure prior to the place of a crown. If necessary, the dentist will file the tooth down before placing the crown to ensure a secure fit. An impression of your teeth is made and sent to the lab so that your crowns are designed to fit properly. After the placement of your crowns, you should not feel any discomfort or pain and you will be able to use them as you would your normal teeth.

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Source by Chris J. Phillips